Real Estate Information

Ann Arbor Real Estate and Area Info Blog

Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 399

3 Reasons to List During the Holidays

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team
 

Before the internet, Buying a Home involved long hours of flipping through MLS books and driving prospects around neighborhoods; something many agents just didn’t have time to do during the busy holiday season. Now that buyers are able to search, filter, and scan through potential listings without leaving their couch; home buying during the holidays has never been easier. Here are three reasons why you should list during the holiday season.

  1. Capitalize on less competition.
    During the holiday season, sellers can feel like they don’t have enough time to maintain their home for showings or negotiate potential offers. Because of this, they wait and re-list their homes at the beginning of the coming year. While this may make sense for some, it can also mean major missed opportunity for you.  Also, if you sell in the winter you will minimize your tax, mortgage and utility payments that you would have spent waiting for spring.  

The smaller number of listed properties can work out in your favor since more potential buyers can potentially see your client’s home. Make sure you take advantage of this opportunity by keeping your home show-ready at all times and having the best listing price possible. If your home has been on the market for a while, this may be an opportune time to consider a price adjustment or contacting us to discuss our full service marketing plans.

  1. Enhance the emotional experience.
    Buying a home is an emotional experience for both the buyer and the seller. Often, the buyer’s emotional connection to the home is what really solidifies the sale. The holidays are an especially sentimental time for many, as they bring back warm memories and allow buyers to imagine future celebrations.

selling a home over the holiday season enhances the emotional connection that a potential buyer can make with your client’s home. Foster this opportunity by staging your home accordingly. Since different types of potential buyers will be coming to visit, avoid including overly religious decor.  Instead, opt for simple and classic, such as a wreath on the door, a simple tree devoid of children’s popsicle-stick decorations in the main room, and subtle garland in the kitchen. Also, consider burning a pine or cranberry-scented candle for those buyers who come over for a tour.

  1. Work with motivated buyers.
    If someone ventures out to look for a home during the holiday season, it’s clear that they’re a motivated buyer. They maybe a relo executive or have to move for a new job or just getting the jump on the spring market early.  Take advantage of this opportunity by making sure the property is marketed in the best way possible. This could be a great time to update listing pictures,  make sure you have a competitive listing price, or re-post the listing on both agent and seller's social pages or blog.  In addition to this, sellers should be flexible around this time, in case a potential buyer wants to schedule a last-minute showing. This is also a reason why the listing should be in peak-showing condition.

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

103 Tolan, Milan, MIchigan is a Home For Sale

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Updated Two Story Home - Priced to Sell

Two Minute Walk to Downtown - This charming two story, is tucked in a quiet subdivision and just a half block from downtown Milan center of town so coffee and shops are just seconds away. New carpet in Living room and stairs and new flooring in kitchen and bath providing a turn key move in experience  French doors with Hardwood flooring in the study and dining spaces plus the full bath on the main floor comes in handy.  

You will also enjoy the three season screened-in porch on those warm summer nights that overlooks your fenced back yard and so much more!  So hurry, this one will not last long.  Click here for more photos and watch the video below.  

  • Updated Flooring and Paint throughout
  • Updated Mechanicals and Central AC
  • Hardwood Flooring
  • Central Air Conditioning
  • Detached Garage
  • Fenced Back Yard

​​Contact us to setup a showing appointment.  

Please CALL 734-996-0000 for more information and to get on the First to View List.  Check out the Walk through Video and new Photos.  

 

 
 

Thanksgiving in Ann Arbor Michigan

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

HAPPY THANKSGIVING FROM TOM AND HIS TEAM

Thank you for your past and future consideration.  We truly appreciate having the opportunity to help and participate in your life changing decisions.  

 

Saline Real Estate, Ann Arbor Real Estate, Tom Stachler, Real estate, agent, broker builder

How Long $1 Million Will Last in Retirement in Every State

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

10,000 people turn 65 in the U.S. every single day. The average American retirement age is 63, and the life expectancy for retirees is about 85. That means Americans should plan to spend 22 years in retirement. The AARP suggests a retirement income nest egg of at least $1 million, but the Buying power of $1 million varies wildly depending on where you live. So if you’re asking “how long will my money last in retirement,” the answer depends on your state.

In order to determine how long $1 million will last the average retiree in each state, we found the average total expenditures for people 65 and older, which includes groceries, housing, utilities, transportation and healthcare. Then, we multiplied that by the cost of living index in each state to find the average expenditure cost for each state.

Waikiki Beach
Waikiki Beach

50. Hawaii

$1 million will last: 11 years, 11 months

If you retire with $1 million in Hawaii, you have just shy of a dozen years to ride out your savings. At $5,626 a year, the cost of groceries is by far the highest in the nation, and housing is no picnic, either. At $46,478 a year, housing costs in Hawaii blow away the next-most-expensive state by nearly $16,000 a year. In all, annual expenditures are nearly $23,000 more in Hawaii than the next-priciest state.

49. California

$1 million will last: 16 years, 5 months

Only one state other than Hawaii requires annual expenditures of more than $60,000 — and that state is California, where retirees spend $60,877 a year to get by. Hawaii is also the only state to trump California in the category of housing costs. Although it’s nearly $16,000 more forgiving than Hawaii, housing in California is a brutal $30,514 a year. It costs a lot to live and retire comfortably in the Golden State. Do I have enough to retire? If you have $1 million and you’re asking this question in California, the answer is no.

48. Alaska

$1 million will last: 17 years, 0 months

America’s other noncontiguous state joins Hawaii near the bottom of the retirement-dollar-stretching pack. It costs $58,733 to get through a year in Alaska, thanks in large part to a painfully high $4,651 annual grocery bill, which is second in the nation behind Hawaii. Housing is actually a relatively forgiving $21,585 a year, but even so, you can expect your luck — and your $1 million — to run out in exactly 17 years. That means the amount of money needed to retire in Alaska is more than $1 million.

47. New York

$1 million will last: 17 years, 1 month

How long will my money last? That’s the question every retiree wants to know. In New York, the answer is not long enough. $1 million will take you slightly further in the Empire State than in the frozen wilderness of Alaska — one month further, to be exact. Utilities are relatively benign, but both groceries and transportation claim the title of ninth-highest in the nation. The real trouble, however, is housing. At $29,055, housing in New York costs more than it does in all but just two other states.

46. Massachusetts

$1 million will last: 17 years, 4 months

The big financial killer in pricey Massachusetts is healthcare, which costs an individual $6,844 a year in the state. That’s more than all but two states in the entire country. At $4,628 a year, utilities are a major burden as well. In fact, just three states pay higher utility bills. In all, Massachusetts residents need about $57,795 a year to support the cost of living in the state. Like every other state on this list so far, $1 million is not enough to support a retirement in Massachusetts.

45. Connecticut

$1 million will last: 17 years, 4 months

You can expect $1 million to last exactly as long in Connecticut as it does in Massachusetts, which is not long enough. Also, like their neighbors to the north, people who retire in Connecticut will be required to kick a large chunk of their annual spending to healthcare. At $6,619 a year, Connecticut has the fifth-highest healthcare costs in the nation.

44. Maryland

$1 million will last: 17 years, 4 months

Retirees can also stretch $1 million for only 17 years and four months in the Mid-Atlantic state of Maryland. At $28,899 a year, Maryland is Home to the country’s fourth-highest housing costs. A retiree can also expect to spend about $7,394 a year on transportation. In all, the cost of living is $57,661 per year.

43. Oregon

$1 million will last: 17 years, 7 months

With an annual average of $27,316, just four states demand more from their retirees in terms of housing costs than Oregon. At $3,938 a year, grocery bills are also high compared to the national average. Residents get a break, however, in the category of utilities. The annual cost is just $2,903, which is the second-lowest in the country. In the end, $1 million won’t cut it if you want to retire in Oregon.

If you’re staying in Oregon but still want to cut costs, consider moving to the Hermiston-Pendleton area in Eastern Oregon. It’s the best place to live in Oregon on a fixed income.

42. Rhode Island

$1 million will last: 18 years, 2 months

Rhode Island is the first state where $1 million will see you through an average length retirement. Healthcare, transportation and groceries all cost more in Rhode Island than they do in most of the country, but not by much. The big bank breakers are housing, which costs $21,942 per year, and utilities, which costs retirees in the state $4,621 per year. In total, you’ll need about $55,026 a year if you want to retire in the smallest state in the nation.

41. New Jersey

$1 million will last: 18 years, 6 months

Rounding out the top 10 is the Garden State. The most densely packed state in the Union, New Jerseyeans pay more than the national average across all categories, but where they really get crushed is housing, with the eighth-highest average cost. Four walls and a roof cost an average of $23,573. At $4,207 per year, utilities in New Jersey aren’t cheap either.

40. Vermont

$1 million will last: 18 years, 7 months

Healthcare costs in Vermont are only slightly above the national average, but across all other categories, the increases are significant. Planning to retire in Vermont? Housing will cost you $22,377 a year. Utilities will run you $4,392, the sixth-highest in the country. In total, the cost of living in Vermont is about $53,909 per year.

39. New Hampshire

$1 million will last: 19 years

In Vermont’s neighboring New England state of New Hampshire, you can squeeze a full 19 years out of $1 million. At $4,128 a year, the cost of groceries is well above the national average. At $4,824, the annual bill for utilities is even higher compared to the rest of the nation. In fact, New Hampshire residents can expect to pay higher-than-average costs across all categories.

38. Maine

$1 million will last: 19 years, 6 months

At $3,347 a year, retirees in Maine pay grocery bills that are a little bit below the national average — but every other category is higher. The worst of the bunch is the cost of housing, which comes in at $19,877 per year. At $4,251, the annual cost of utilities is high as well. In total, Mainers pay about $51,364 a year to live in the state.

37. Washington

$1 million will last: 21 years, 1 month

On the other side of the continent, the state of Washington offers retirees the opportunity to stretch $1 million more than 21 years. Residents pay $3,334 for utilities, which is fairly well below the national average. All other categories are slightly above, for a grand total of $47,389 per year.

36. Delaware

$1 million will last: 21 years, 10 months

Residents of the First State pay roughly $15,281 for housing, which is slightly less than the national average of $15,529. Transportation costs are the sixth-lowest of all states, and retirees in Delaware also pay less than the average American for healthcare. They pay a little more than average, however, for groceries and utilities. In all, the state drums up annual expenses of about $45,781.

35. Pennsylvania

$1 million will last: 21 years, 11 months

About $45,602 will get you through a year of retirement in the state of Pennsylvania. At $5,152, healthcare costs are lower than all but three states. Everything else is a little more expensive than in the country as a whole, with the utilities ranking the 11th-highest out of all states, costing $4,019 a year.

34. Virginia

$1 million will last: 22 years

With annual expenses of $45,423, people who retire in Virginia can make $1 million last for 22 years. Compared to other states, Virginia ranks best in transportation, where retirees spend the eighth-lowest amount. The state ranked about average in utilities and healthcare. The category that’s more expensive than average is housing, which costs $17,191 a year.

33. Colorado

$1 million will last: 22 years

At $6,107, the cost of healthcare in Colorado is higher than it is in the country as a whole. At $17,517, housing costs are also higher than average. Everything else, however, is cheaper than average, especially utilities, which cost $3,059 a year. In all, people who retire in Colorado will spend around $45,379 per year.

32. Nevada

$1 million will last: 22 years

You’ll take $1 million about as far in Nevada as you would if you retired in Virginia or Colorado. With an annual cost of $3,109, Nevadans get off relatively easy when it comes to utilities. Housing, however, comes in at $16,601, which is slightly higher than average. Both transportation and healthcare costs are also more than average by a fairly steep margin.

31. South Carolina

$1 million will last: 22 years, 3 months

Rounding out the bottom 20 is South Carolina, which requires about $44,887 in total annual expenses. The cost of groceries and healthcare are a little more expensive than the national average, but not by much. Costing $4,095 a year, South Carolina performs worst in the utilities category, while the costs of transportation and housing are below average.

Most Americans expect to rely primarily on their 401k accounts to pay for retirement, a GOBankingRates survey found. There are secret moves you can make to double your 401k.

30. Florida

$1 million will last: 22 years, 4 months

Grocery costs are relatively high in Florida, with the average annual bill coming in at $3,602. The $15,172 annual cost of housing is slightly above average, as are transportation and utility costs. But Floridian retirees will see some savings in healthcare costs, which are slightly cheaper than average. In all, the annual cost of living in the Sunshine State is $44,843.

29. South Dakota

$1 million will last: 22 years, 4 months

At $44,753, the cost of living per year in South Dakota stands just above the national average of $44,664. Housing is comparatively expensive, with an average cost of $17,563. The category where South Dakota residents do the best is transportation, which at an annual cost of $6,157 is the fifth-lowest of all states.

28. Minnesota

$1 million will last: 22 years, 6 months

In Minnesota, groceries, transportation and especially healthcare costs are higher than the national average. Healthcare alone costs $6,447 a year. The silver linings are utilities and housing, which are cheaper than the national average. When you retire in Minnesota, expect to spend $44,530 a year, which is just under the national average.

27. North Dakota

$22 million will last: 22 years, 7 months

In North Dakota, $1 million goes just slightly further than it does in Minnesota, its neighbor to the east. Utilities are cheap in North Dakota, with an average annual bill of $3,196, ninth-lowest of all states. At $14,628, housing costs are below-average. Groceries are slightly above average. Across all categories, healthcare costs are highest, with an annual bill of $6,452 and a ranking of No. 7 in the nation.

26. Montana

$1 million will last: 22 years, 10 months

To the west of North Dakota is Montana, which requires about $43,771 to cover annual expenses. Groceries and healthcare costs are just about even with the national average in Montana. Utilities, however, are cheapest in the nation. The average annual bill is $2,877.

25. Illinois

$1 million will last: 23 years, 1 month

The first state on the front end of the list is Illinois, which requires retirees to pay about $43,369 per year to cover the cost of living. Transportation and utilities are more expensive than the national average. Healthcare, housing and groceries are all lower than average, although not by much.

24. Arizona

$1 million will last: 23 years, 2 months

Arizona has just one category that’s more expensive than the national average, and that’s groceries, which cost residents about $3,439 a year. Housing costs come in at a respectable $14,613, and utilities, healthcare and transportation costs also come in just under the national average.

23. Wisconsin

$1 million will last: 23 years, 3 months

In Wisconsin, living expenses will run retirees $43,056 a year. At $6,441, the cost of healthcare is higher than it is in most of the country, and utilities and transportation costs are also higher than the national average. Retirees in Wisconsin, however, catch a break on housing, which costs $13,650 a year.

22. New Mexico

$1 million will last: 23 years, 3 months

$1 million will take retirees in New Mexico almost exactly as far as it would in Wisconsin. At $3,073 a year, annual utility bills are cheap in the state, and both housing and groceries are less expensive than the national average, as well. Residents of the state, however, can expect to pay a little more for healthcare and transportation.

If you want to keep working in retirement, there are lots of senior-friendly jobs that are perfect.

21. West Virginia

$1 million will last: 23 years, 6 months

 

If you plan to retire in West Virginia, you can expect to spend $3,602 on groceries a year, or a little more than the average American pays. At $5,296 a year, healthcare costs are a little lower than average. Utilities are also cheaper, with an average cost of $3,178. In total, the cost of living is roughly $42,565 per year.

20. Wyoming

$1 million will last: 23 years, 8 months

The first state in the top 20 is Wyoming, where it costs about $42,297 to live for a year. Groceries and utilities are a little expensive in Wyoming compared to the national average. Every other category, however, is cheaper. The category with the most savings is housing, where costs are just $12,920.

19. Kentucky

$1 million will last: 23 years, 8 months

Kentucky is the heart of Appalachia — and a state where $1 million goes a fairly long way. Annual housing costs are a relatively cheap $13,122 a year. With an annual bill of $3,076, groceries are also pretty cheap, as is the annual cost of healthcare, which is around $5,272. In total, you can expect to spend about $42,252 per year.

18. North Carolina

$1 million will last: 23 years, 8 months

The cost of living is cheaper than average across all categories in North Carolina — except for healthcare, which costs $6,147 a year. The least-expensive category compared to the national average is the most significant — housing, which costs around $13,246 a year. In total, retirees in North Carolina can expect to spend about $42,207.

17. Utah

$1 million will last: 23 years, 10 months

At just $2,946, utility rates in Utah are third-lowest in the country. At $14,240 a year, housing is relatively inexpensive, too. In fact, the only category that is pricier than the national average is groceries, but not by much. When all is said and done, retirees will spend around $41,984 per year.

16. Nebraska

$1 million will last: 23 years, 10 months

The annual cost of transportation in Nebraska is $7,051, which is the only category that is more expensive than the national average. Housing costs just $13,743, and at $3,204, the cost of annual utilities are also relatively inexpensive. When everything is calculated, retirees can expect to spend about $41,939 in the state of Nebraska.

Maybe $1 million is enough for you for retirement. Learn how to determine how much money you need to retire.

15. Louisiana

$1 million will last: 23 years, 10 months

Retirees in Louisiana pay less in every category than the average American, but not dramatically in most cases. Groceries and transportation both hover just under the national average, but the real reason Louisiana is in the top 15 is housing, which costs about $13,666 per year. When everything is included, you can expect to spend about $41,895 a year.

14. Ohio

$1 million will last: 24 years, 2 months

At just $11,429 a year, Ohio boasts the second-lowest annual housing costs in the entire country. Every other category hovers near the national average — at $6,880, the cost of transportation is actually a bit higher. Cheap housing, however, launches Ohio into the top 15, with total annual living expenses of $41,404.

13. Iowa

$1 million will last: 24 years, 3 months

Several factors contribute to Iowa’s relatively cheap $41,225 annual cost of living. First and foremost, housing is fairly inexpensive, coming in at just $12,967 a year. The $3,191 annual grocery bill is also cheap compared to the national average. Healthcare and transportation costs are about even.

12. Kansas

$1 million will last: 24 years, 7 months

Retirees can get by in Kansas on about $40,689 a year. All categories are cheaper than the national average, but residents don’t enjoy anything spectacular — except, that is, for housing. The annual cost of housing in Kansas is $12,191, the ninth-lowest cost in the nation.

11. Idaho

$1 million will last: 24 years, 8 months

At $7,161, the annual cost of transportation is slightly more expensive than the national average — but everything else is cheaper. This is especially true for housing, which costs $12,439 a year. This, along with a fairly low $2,913 grocery bill, makes Idaho an attractive place to retire, with a $40,555 annual cost of living.

10. Alabama

$1 million will last: 24 years, 9 months

In Alabama, utility costs are fairly high — $3,968, to be exact, higher than the national average. The state makes up for that and squeezes into the top 10, however, in other areas. At $5,019, healthcare costs are relatively low — but the real bonus comes from housing. The cost of housing in Alabama is just $11,460. Only two states can claim an average that’s more affordable. Mobile, Ala., is one of the best places to live on only a social security check.

9. Indiana

$1 million will last: 24 years, 9 months

If you retire in Indiana, you can enjoy costs across all categories that are lower than the national average. Groceries cost $3,235 annually. Transportation costs will run you $6,380. At $5,324 a year, healthcare is relatively cheap. The real savings, however, come from housing costs, which average just $12,082 a year.

8. Texas

$1 million will last: 24 years, 9 months

Both groceries and housing are fairly cheap in the Lonestar State, coming in at $3,035 and $12,889, respectively. Both utilities and healthcare costs are also lower than the national average, but just barely. Transportation costs come in at $6,374, for a total yearly cost of living of $40,376.

7. Missouri

$1 million will last: 24 years, 10 months

While everything but utilities is cheaper in Missouri compared to the national average, the state earns its place near the top of the list through housing. Housing costs in Missouri are just $11,476. That’s the fourth-cheapest in the country, and it makes Missouri one of just six states to break the $12,000 mark.

6. Georgia

$1 million will last: 24 years, 11 months

Georgia is also a member of the sub-$12,000 club with housing costs that average just $11,600. Every other category is also cheaper than the national average, as well, but not by nearly as much. If you retire in Georgia, you can get away with spending just $40,198 a year.

5. Tennessee

$1 million will last: 25 years

Not only does Tennessee have the distinction of being the first state in the top five, but it’s also the first state that allows retirees to squeeze a full quarter century out of $1 million. Tennessee residents largely have housing to thank for that. The cost of housing in the state is just $12,221 per year.

4. Michigan

$1 million will last: 25 years

Michiganders can also make $1 million last for 25 years. Healthcare costs just $5,416 a year in Michigan, and at $3,323, utilities are fairly cheap, too. The biggest advantage for retirees, however, is the fact that annual housing costs average just $12,330. In total, the estimated cost of living is $39,974.

3. Oklahoma

$1 million will last: 25 years, 2 months

One of just four states with an annual cost of living under $40,000, Oklahoma has a lot to offer retirees. Groceries cost just $3,201, and transportation costs come in at $6,113. The real steal, however, is that the cost of housing is $11,616, which is the sixth-cheapest in the nation. Even if you only have $100,000 saved, your nest egg will stretch far in Oklahoma.

2. Arkansas

$1 million will last: 25 years, 6 months

At $39,260, the cost of living in Arkansas is cheaper than it is in all but one other state. Housing costs just $12,004 a year, and groceries cost a low $3,100 — the fourth-lowest cost in the country. Everything else is comparatively cheap in Arkansas, too. Healthcare costs are second-lowest in the country at $5,025, and you can expect to spend just $5,997 in transportation costs, the lowest amount in the nation.

1. Mississippi

$1 million will last: 26 years, 4 months

Mississippi is the only state in the country where $1 million lasts more than 26 years. Not only is Mississippi the cheapest state in the nation, but at $11,134, it also has the lowest housing costs of any state. In total, you’ll spend just $37,964 to get through a whole year in Mississippi, where retirees can stretch their money farther than anywhere else.

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

Top 10 States for Homeowners to Invest in Renewable Energy

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Top 10 States for Homeowners to Invest in Renewable Energy

 
 

Economically speaking, the gap between states with renewable energy sector policy support and states without it is incredibly vast. States with no incentives or legislative support for renewable technologies see almost no investment in renewable technologies when compared with supported or incentivized states such as California, Massachusetts, and New York.

For homeowners looking to invest in renewable energy, the presence or lack of government backing makes location a key consideration. If you’re thinking of investing in renewable energy for your Home, here are the top ten states for obtaining this power source:

  1. California

While many other states lead in per capita investment, California’s sizeable population and economic footprint make it the largest driver of renewable energy in the nation, especially in solar power. It’s even the nation’s largest investor in electric vehicles. As the leader in renewable energy sector policy, the state is eyeing a totally clean energy grid in the coming decades.

  1. Vermont

Vermont is a national leader for grassroots cooperative energy production and is the only state to rank in all ten of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ indicators for renewable energy development. Vermont is also the number-one state in the nation for per capita renewable energy employment, with over 18,000 individuals driving economic growth and a greener energy portfolio.

  1. Massachusetts

Massachusetts makes a high appearance in nine different categories of renewable energy market drivers listed by the Union of Concerned Scientists, and the state is first in the nation for policies that incentivize utilities to grow their local renewable energy markets. Solar energy production per capita is in the national top five, and new investments in wind energy promise continued growth. In 2017, Massachusetts utilities signed their first offshore wind agreements, opening up a new investment market for homeowners drawn to innovation and bleeding-edge markets.

  1. Rhode Island

Rhode Island’s concentration on policies and initiatives that incentivize greenhouse gas reduction have made it a top state for emissions mitigation. It was the first state in the U.S. to invest in offshore wind farms, a rapidly expanding new market for wind power. Additionally, the state’s investments in residential solar are among the highest in the nation, and Rhode Island is investing in hydro and biomass to round out an impressive portfolio of technologies.

  1. Hawaii

Hawaii is first in the nation for residential solar per capita and is investing heavily in geothermal energy. Big challenges still remain for Hawaii, though; 91% of the energy the state consumed in 2015 was imported, with petroleum as the primary source. Hawaii’s energy-conscious residents consume the fourth least amount of electricity in the nation and are keen investors in solar energy, driving a major employment market for the state.

  1. Oregon

Oregon’s decision-makers are keeping pace with the state’s rapidly expanding renewable energy sector by offering legislative support and incentives. New investments helped wind power grow to 11% of the state’s total energy consumption in 2015. Clean power initiatives include community investments in wind and solar, and these cooperatives allow homeowners to invest in the growing market without installing anything on their own properties. 

  1. Maine

Maine more than doubled its commitments to wind power between 2011 and 2015, accounting for three-fifths of the total wind production for New England and 14% of the state’s electricity consumption. The state is also a leading producer of biomass energy, accounting for 25% of the state’s energy production—on par with its commitment to hydropower. 

  1. Washington

Washington has been a longstanding national leader in hydroelectric power generation, the largest source of electricity in the state. In recent years, Washington has diversified its portfolio, expanding wind power generation to cover roughly 6% of the state’s total electricity production. Washington’s residents are also number three in the nation for electric vehicle adoption, trailing behind Oregon and California.

  1. New York

New York is a policy leader for the renewable energy market, and New York’s State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has been a major driver of renewable technologies since 1975. The state continues to lead with innovative legislation—like the NY Green Bank, a proven green investment strategy that promises to build a foundation for future growth. Local incentive programs such as the NY-Sun Initiative have helped the state grow its residential solar market by over 800% since 2011.

  1. Iowa

Between 2008 and 2015, Iowa’s total energy production from wind grew from 4% of its total consumption to a whopping 31.3%, making the state the national leader for wind power. Local governance boards, such as the Iowa Utilities Board, are approving massive-scale solar projects, like the privately funded Wind XI installation, which point to even more renewable energy development in Iowa’s future. This state is an industry leader in the Midwest, where renewable energy adoption has increased rapidly.

How does your local town or city perform in renewable investments and incentives? Share in the comments below.

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

 

Ypsilanti Income Properties for Sale

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Two Duplex Income Property Homes for Sale

Want a great investment and add a couple income properties to your portfolio?  We have two properties fully Lease and managed through August 2018 for your perusal.  Check out the brief walk through videos below and also the attached operating statements for each.  Units have been well maintain and there is plenty of parking and well located between the Eastern Michigan Central Campus and EMU College of Business in dowtown Ann Arbor.  

You can purchase one or bundle them both together.  Call Tom for more details.  

OPEN house

​Contact our office for more details, but we will be showing both these properties WED November 8, 2017 from 12 -1pm.  

Operating Statement for 514 Washtenaw Click Here

 

514 Washtenaw, Ypsilanti, MI

 Click here for Listing Info

 

518 Washtenaw, Ypsilanti, MI

Click Here for Listing Info

Operating Statement for 518 Washtenaw Click Here

 

Call Us to make a showing appointment or get on the First to View List

 

Beware Of This NEW Hotel Scam When You Are Checking Into Your Hotel

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Beware Of This NEW Hotel Scam When You Are Checking Into Your Hotel

New hotel scam that you need to be aware of. Please take this very seriously as its a very simple scam.

This is one of the smartest scams I have heard about. You arrive at your hotel and check in at the front desk. Typically when checking in, you give the front desk your credit card (for any charges to your room) and they don’t retain the card. You go to your room and settle in. All is good. The hotel receives a call and the caller asks for (as an example) room 620 – which happens to be your room.

The phone rings in your room. You answer and the person on the other end says the following: ‘This is the front desk. When checking in, we came across a problem with your charge card information. Please re-read me your credit card numbers and verify the last 3 digits numbers at the reverse side of your charge card.’ Not thinking anything wrong, since the call seems to come from the front desk you oblige. But actually, it is a scam by someone calling from outside the hotel. They have asked for a random room number, then ask you for your credit card and address information.

They sound so professional, that you think you are talking to the front desk. If you ever encounter this scenario on your travels, tell the caller that you will be down to the front desk to clear up any problems. Then, go to the front desk or call directly and ask if there was a problem. If there was none, inform the manager of the hotel that someone tried toscam you of your credit card information, acting like a front desk employee.

This was sent by someone who has been duped…….. and is still cleaning up the mess. P.S. Please, consider spreading the word by forwarding this message. Who knows, you might just help someone avoid a nasty experience. All traveling often should be aware of this one!’

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

Buying a Home? Factor These Into Your Interest Rate Calculations

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

Buying a Home? Factor These Into Your Interest Rate Calculations

The mortgage process can be complicated if you jump in without any prior knowledge on home-buying and lending. The best tool you can arm yourself with is an understanding of how your mortgage interest rate is calculated.

Credit can make or break you. 

Your credit score will determine how reliable you are in the lending world. The higher your score, the lower your interest rate will likely be. Check your credit on one of the three major credit reporting agency sites—TransUnion, Experian and Equifax—or your credit card company may have a free credit report service (although these aren't as reliable). Improve your FICO score for a better chance at a lower interest rate.

Factor in size and location.

  • State or County: Even your place of residence can affect your rate.
  • Local Mortgage Lenders: Shop around. Interest rates can vary from company to company even if they're located in the same town.
  • Loan Size: The size of your home can also impact your interest rate. The bigger the loan, the higher your interest rate will be if you're not putting more money down.
  • Down Payment Size: Your mortgage interest rate may also depend on how much you're putting down and if your loan includes closing costs and private mortgage insurance (PMI). Putting down less than 20 percent can increase your risk factor and may require PMI, but your interest rate may be lower depending on the loan.

Not all loans are created equal.

Loan Length: Your loan terms play a bigger role in interest rate calculations than you think. Have you decided whether you want to pay off your loan in 15 or 30 years? You may pay more per month with a shorter term, but you'll be paying less interest over the life of your loan. Short-term loans may also have a smaller interest rate.

Fixed or Adjustable: You'll also have to consider whether a fixed- or adjustable-rate loan is right for you. Your interest rate can change over time if you choose an adjustable-rate loan. It may start off low or fixed, but can increase over time depending on market conditions. Fixed-rate loans, however, will have a higher interest rate attached to them.

Loan Type: Interest rates can also vary according to your loan type. Choosing a loan can be overwhelming, but a local lender should be able to provide you with the best options. Some of the more popular loans are conventional, FHA and VA loans. While FHA loans have less down payment restrictions and a smaller interest rate, your monthly payment can be more expensive due to the required PMI added on. VA loans can have smaller interest rates and don't require PMI like FHA does. Conventional loans are widely accepted in the real estate industry as dependable, but your interest rate may be higher.

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

Start Your Home Maintenance Before the Holidays

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team
  1. Wake your heating system from hibernation.
    No homeowner wants to wake up seeing their own breath because the furnace broke down in the middle of the night. Schedule a furnace check-up now with a heating system professional to ensure everything is running properly and that your system meets the manufacturer’s rated efficiency. One of the biggest causes of wasted energy is restricted air flow to the heating system, so have a contractor check that the filters and coils are allowing for enough air flow. Getting ahead of this issue will help you avoid appointment delays during the busy winter season and give you peace of mind.
  1. Give your gutters a fresh start.
    Leaves, twigs and other debris can easily clog gutters, which can lead to ice dams. Ice dams cause melting water to back up and flow into the house, resulting in a very expensive repair. Save yourself the money and trouble by thoroughly cleaning out your gutters after the leaves have fallen. Make sure to tighten gutter hangers and downspout brackets, and replace any worn sections before it’s too late. Check that downspouts extend at least five feet away from the foundation. If they don’t, buy an inexpensive extension.
  1. Mind the gaps.
    Walk around the inside and outside of your home and check it for air tightness, carefully looking for any signs of cracks where air could leak out, as this can be a significant source of energy loss. An inexpensive tube of caulk can help seal the leaks and also help prevent moisture from getting inside the walls of your home. Caulk and seal air leaks where plumbing, ducting or electrical wiring comes through walls or floors.
  1. Get smart—a smart thermostat, that is.
    The Wi-Fi rage is real, especially when it comes to your thermostat. If you still have a manual thermostat or even a programmable one, consider upgrading to a smart thermostat. Today’s models can learn your living patterns, heat only rooms that are occupied, turn up the heat as you near your home, allow you to make adjustments remotely from your phone, and much more. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, you can save as much as 10 percent a year in energy usage (and on your utility bills) by making smart adjustments to your thermostat.
  1. Double-check doors
    Inspect all doors that open to the outside or to the attic and be sure that they close tightly. An easy way to check for air leaks: place a piece of tissue in a clothespin, hold it at various points along the doorway and watch for any movement near the edge of the door and the frame. If you have a leak, take a photo of your door and door jamb, and ask an employee at your local hardware store for help finding the right weatherstripping or door sweeps. Air leaks cause your heating system to work harder, which costs you more money on your utility bills—and can shorten the lifespan of your system. 

Tom Stachler is a Michigan licensed real estate Broker and Builder working in the Ann Arbor, Saline and Dexter Real Estate markets.  Please refer to the helpful Links above for more information about Buying or selling real estate, homes and condos when searching for one of the area's best real estate brokers. 

The Biggest Land Owners in America

by Tom Stachler,ABR,CDPE - Group One Realty Team

The 10 Biggest Landowners in America

There are many ways the ultrarich invest their money. One is real estate.

Every year, The Land Report documents the biggest landowners in America. To make it into the top 10 for the most recent year, you'd have to own nearly 1 million acres. The No. 1 person on the list, John Malone, who built a fortune in the media business, owns a reported 2.2 million acres.

Six of the individuals and families on the list own sprawling ranches in places like Wyoming, New Mexico, and Texas.

Just last year, Stan Kroenke -- owner of the Los Angeles Rams, Denver Nuggets, and other sports franchises -- bought the 510,527-acre Waggoner Ranch, which spans six Texas counties. With his other holdings, that's enough to rank Kroenke fourth on the latest Land Report.

A bar chart showing the 10 biggest landowners in America

DATA SOURCE: THE LAND REPORT. CHART BY AUTHOR.

Other notable ranch owners on the list include Malone, Ted Turner, the Singleton family, and the King Ranch heirs. 

The rest of the 10 biggest landowners in the United States are owners of timberland. The Emmerson family is the nation's second-largest lumber producer, controlling nearly 2 million acres of timberland in California and Washington. The Reed and Irving families are similarly major timber producers.

Together, these landowners control an estimated 14 million acres. That's meaningfully larger than the state of Maryland (7.9 million acres), but slightly short of West Virginia (15.5 million acres).

Tom Stachler is a licensed real estate Broker and builder living and working in the Ann Arbor Michigan area.  Please check out the Links on this website for further information about Ann Arbor and Saline Michigan Real Estate information, videos and listings.  

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 399

Syndication

Categories

Archives